AFL-CIO

The AFL-CIO will not be making an early endorsement in the 2020 presidential contest.

There will be no early endorsement of any of the candidates who have announced, Lee Saunders, chair of the federations political committee, told Peoples World, as he arrived in New Orleans for the 2019 winter meeting of the AFL-CIO Executive Council.

The AFL-CIO will not be making an early endorsement in the 2020 presidential contest.

There will be no early endorsement of any of the candidates who have announced, Lee Saunders, chair of the federations political committee, told Peoples World, as he arrived in New Orleans for the 2019 winter meeting of the AFL-CIO Executive Council.

The AFL-CIO will not be making an early endorsement in the 2020 presidential contest.

There will be no early endorsement of any of the candidates who have announced, Lee Saunders, chair of the federations political committee, told Peoples World, as he arrived in New Orleans for the 2019 winter meeting of the AFL-CIO Executive Council.

The AFL-CIO will not be making an early endorsement in the 2020 presidential contest.

There will be no early endorsement of any of the candidates who have announced, Lee Saunders, chair of the federations political committee, told Peoples World, as he arrived in New Orleans for the 2019 winter meeting of the AFL-CIO Executive Council.

The AFL-CIO is renewing and strengthening its commitment to approximately half a million workers, all on federal Temporary Protected Status (TPS), whom, with their families, xenophobic and racist GOP President Donald Trump wants to deport.

The pledges, from federation Secretary-Treasurer Liz Shuler, Executive Vice President Tefere Gebre and other top officials, came at a Nov. 27 ceremony at AFL-CIO headquarters.

All workers, union and non-union, public and private, have their workplace rights up for grabs, AFL-CIO Executive Vice President Tefere Gebre says.

Sometime this month, the U.S. Supreme Court will decide if workers still have a right to a voice in the workplace, he told the American Constitution Society, a coalition of progressive attorneys and jurists, including pro-worker labor lawyers. Gebre did not differentiate between classes or types of workers.

The way Gebre and many union leaders see it, the answer to that question will be no.

For over nearly four decades, Diann Woodard fought to give Michigans children a better future while fighting for justice and rights for teachers and school administrators. Today, Americas labor movement haslost a champion, an exemplary leader and educator. And Ive lost a friend. From her days growing up in a UAW household in Detroit to her lifelong service to our country as a teacher, guidance counselor, assistant principal and labor leader on the AFL-CIO Executive Council, Diann always put workers, students and families first.

(Washington, DC, Jan. 19, 2018) Today, the AFL-CIO joined unions, public and private employers, elected officials from both parties, religious organizations, academics and civil rights organizations filing amicus briefs in Janus v. AFSCME, defending working peoples right to effectively organize and negotiate.